Nuclear Sclerosis

Nuclear/Lenticular Sclerosis
By Dr. Karen Burgess

nuclear sclerosis, eye vet

What is nuclear or lenticular sclerosis?
Nuclear or lenticular sclerosis is the normal aging process of the lens.  The lens is a transparent structure within the eye that bends light and reflects images to brain’s visual center or retina.  Over time the lens stays the same size but becomes harder as more fibers are continually laid down within.

Why do dogs develop nuclear sclerosis?
Nuclear or lenticular sclerosis is a normal aging process of the eyes.

What does a nuclear sclerosis look like?
Most owners will notice a symmetrical gray blue haze to the eyes often easier to see from the side than the front.  Sometimes nuclear sclerosis can be confused with cataracts which are more opaque and white in nature.  Cataracts represent a more serious condition that affects vision.

Does nuclear sclerosis affect vision?
Typically nuclear sclerosis does not significantly impact vision.  Some owners may notice change in depth perception or seeing items close up.  Additionally as the normal retina ages, night vision may become more difficult.

What are treatment options for nuclear sclerosis?
There is no treatment for nuclear sclerosis indicated or necessary.

 

 

 

 

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